Cfp: 4th Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune

Dear All,

The 4th Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune will take place in Toronto on November 17, and we would love to see you there ! Submit your proposals for 10-minutes presentations to tribunelitcomp@gmail.com by August 21 !

Allô à tou.t.e.s !

La 4e Tribune des étudiants de lit.comp. aura lieu à Toronto en novembre ! Vous avez jusqu’au 21 août pour soumettre vos propositions (pour des présentations de 10 minutes). Écrivez-vous au tribunelitcomp@gmail.com !

CFP – Tribune 4

2nd edition of the Tribune

The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune is pleased to announce the Call for proposals for its 2nd edition !

Invitation to participate in:

The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune – 2nd edition

30 October 2015

University of Toronto

Comparatists: Assert yourselves!

The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune is a space of encounter for graduate students to share their research projects while reflecting on their discipline. The first edition took place in January 2015 at the Université de Montréal, and gathered students from four Canadian institutions who presented their research in French and English, in a variety of formats.

For its second edition, to take place at the University of Toronto on October 30, 2015, the Tribune encourages comparatist students to present their projects in an original and concise format lasting 10 minutes, so as to promote exchanges, debates and discussions. The Tribune is a privileged space to test unconventional modes of presentation and to explore the development of one’s PhD or MA thesis or any other project.

The Tribune particularly encourages presentations that:

  • Offer a synthesized look at the conclusions or the structure of a research project;
  • Define the limits or shortcomings of a research project, potentially proposing some possible solutions;
  • Describe the theoretical, methodological, institutional or practical difficulties encountered during research;
  • Explore a different mode of communication (in this case, your proposal should describe the format of your presentation);
  • Develop a critical reflection on the current practices of communicating research in academia;
  • Analyze the current context and challenges of comparative literature.

We welcome your proposals (100 to 200 words), however original and experimental, until 15 August 2015 at the following email address: tribunelitcomp@gmail.com. Please specify your university affiliation and your year of study. Your presentation of a maximum of 10 minutes can be either in French or English (or both!), in the medium of your choice. The selection will be announced by the end of August.

Invitation à participer à :

La tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée – 2ème édition

30 octobre 2015

Université de Toronto

Comparatistes : Affirmez-vous !

La Tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée est un espace de rencontre permettant aux étudiant-e-s de deuxième et troisième cycles de partager leurs projets de recherche tout en réfléchissant aux enjeux de leur discipline. La première rencontre, en janvier 2015 à l’Université de Montréal, a réuni des étudiant-e-s de quatre universités canadiennes, qui ont présenté leurs recherches en français et en anglais, dans des formats variés et selon des approches de tout genre. !

Pour sa deuxième édition, qui se tiendra à l’Université de Toronto le 30 octobre 2015, la Tribune encourage les étudiant-e-s comparatistes à présenter leurs projets dans un format original et concis de 10 minutes, afin de promouvoir les échanges, les débats et les discussions. La Tribune est un lieu privilégié pour venir tester des modes de présentation non conventionnels, et pour se questionner sur le développement de sa thèse, de son mémoire ou d’autres projets parallèles.

La Tribune encourage particulièrement les présentations qui :

  • Proposent un regard synthétique sur les conclusions ou la structure d’un projet de recherche;
    Définissent les limites ou lacunes d’un projet de recherche, en proposant ou non des pistes de solutions;
  • Décrivent les difficultés théoriques, méthodologiques, institutionnelles et pratiques rencontrées au cours de recherches;
  • Explorent un mode de communication différent (dans ce cas, votre proposition devra décrire la forme que prendra votre présentation);
  • Développent une réflexion critique sur les formats académiques de diffusion de la recherche;
  • Analysent le contexte actuel et les défis de la littérature comparée.

Nous attendons vos propositions (100 à 200 mots), aussi originales et expérimentales soient-elles, pour le 15 août 2015 à l’adresse suivante: tribunelitcomp@gmail.com. Veuillez préciser votre université de rattachement et votre cycle d’étude. Votre présentation, d’un maximum de 10 minutes, pourra être prononcée en anglais ou en français (ou les deux !), dans le médium de votre choix. La sélection sera communiquée au plus tard le 30 août.

Continue reading “2nd edition of the Tribune”

The Complit Students’ Tribune

Call for Contributions
Comparatists: Assert yourselves!

Studies in comparative literature bring together a large community of scholars, breathing life into a discipline whose applicability continues to proliferate. Graduate students’ research projects are rich and varied, reflecting the breadth of the discipline, although lacking diffusion within the larger comparatist community. Last winter, students met to think about a possible collaboration between the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Montreal and the Centre for Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. Since then, the obvious lack of connections between graduate students from both universities, as well as from other Canadian universities, became a source of motivation for envisioning a space of encounter where we could discuss our projects on the ground of the discipline we share. The “Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune” aims at encouraging discussions between comparatist graduate students of Canadian universities. By asserting the specificity of each of the comparative literature programs in the country, we hope to identify what unites us in this field of study, and forge lasting friendships between young scholars and contribute to the ongoing conversations about the discipline in Canada. For its first edition, in January 2015, the Tribune will take place at the University of Montreal, and will be organized around the question of the spaces for comparative literature.

Occupy Comparative Literature’s Spaces

Thanks to its polyglot and multicultural specificity, Canada is a privileged space for comparatist studies. But our discipline, little known by the public at large and imperfectly identified within academia itself, suffers today from a lack of institutional recognition. Therefore, it seems urgent for us to affirm, display and reflect its presence and importance. This year, the Tribune proposes to explore the question of spaces (geographical, linguistic, theoretical, etc.) of comparative literature in Canada – spaces of convergence but also spaces of tension. Among the issues we hope to tackle:

  • How does Canada constitute itself as a comparatist laboratory?
  • In what way(s) can comparative literature take (back) its place within institutional spaces, but also within public spaces?
  • How can we consider the very space of comparative literature, at the junction of a plurality of fields – intercultural, interdisciplinary, intermedial, etc.?
  • Finally, how are the limits of these theoretical, institutional and geo-political spaces asserted, obliterated or displaced?

We invite graduate students to present their research projects at any stage of their completion through the prism of these questions. Since the Tribune wishes to be a convivial space of exchange, of discussion and of experimentation, we encourage modes of theoretical and critical expression that are original, transmedial or collaborative. Test your research projects, debate your methodological approach, perform your thesis!

We welcome your proposals (150-200 words) until October 24, 2014 at the following email address: tribunelitcomp@gmail.com. Please specify your university affiliation and your year of study. Your presentation of 10 to 15 minutes can be either in French or English, in the medium of your choice.

Check them out on Facebook

Call for Papers: The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune, Issue 1

Dear Complitters, 

Please find attached (or read below) the call for contributions to The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune. The Tribune wants to be a space where we can discuss our academic projects, reflect on the concerns of our discipline, build collaboration between graduate students from different universities, and get to know each other. Montreal will host the first edition in January (yes, it’s a great opportunity to experience Montreal’s winter!) and we have already planned the second one to be in Toronto next year. 

We hope to see you there! 

You can contact Elise at elise.couture.grondin@mail.utoronto.ca or Jeanne jeanne.mathieu.lessard@mail.utoronto.ca  if you have any questions.

Élise, Jeanne, 

Servanne (UdeM) and Erwan (UdeM)

 

The Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune – 1st edition

January 16, 2014, University of Montréal

 

Comparatists: Assert yourselves! 

            Studies in comparative literature bring together a large community of scholars, breathing life into a discipline whose applicability continues to proliferate. Graduate students’ research projects are rich and varied, reflecting the breadth of the discipline, although lacking diffusion within the larger comparatist community. Last winter, students met to think about a possible collaboration between the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Montreal and the Centre for Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. Since then, the obvious lack of connections between graduate students from both universities, as well as from other Canadian universities, became a source of motivation for envisioning a space of encounter where we could discuss our projects on the ground of the discipline we share. The “Comparative Literature Students’ Tribune” aims at encouraging discussions between comparatist graduate students of Canadian universities. By asserting the specificity of each of the comparative literature programs in the country, we hope to identify what unites us in this field of study, and forge lasting friendships between young scholars and contribute to the ongoing conversations about the discipline in Canada. For its first edition, in January 2015, the Tribune will take place at the University of Montreal, and will be organized around the question of the spaces for comparative literature.

 Occupy Comparative Literature’s Spaces

            Thanks to its polyglot and multicultural specificity, Canada is a privileged space for comparatist studies. But our discipline, little known by the public at large and imperfectly identified within academia itself, suffers today from a lack of institutional recognition. Therefore, it seems urgent for us to affirm, display and reflect its presence and importance. This year, the Tribune proposes to explore the question of spaces (geographical, linguistic, theoretical, etc.) of comparative literature in Canada – spaces of convergence but also spaces of tension. Among the issues we hope to tackle:

 

    How does Canada constitute itself as a comparatist laboratory?

    In what way(s) can comparative literature take (back) its place within institutional spaces, but also within public spaces?

    How can we consider the very space of comparative literature, at the junction of a plurality of fields – intercultural, interdisciplinary, intermedial, etc.?

     Finally, how are the limits of these theoretical, institutional and geo-political spaces asserted, obliterated or displaced?

 

            We invite graduate students to present their research projects at any stage of their completion through the prism of these questions. Since the Tribune wishes to be a convivial space of exchange, of discussion and of experimentation, we encourage modes of theoretical and critical expression that are original, transmedia or collaborative. Test your research projects, debate your methodological approach, perform your thesis!

We welcome your proposals (150-200 words) until October 24, 2014 at the following email address: tribunelitcomp@gmail.com. Please specify your university affiliation and your year of study. Your presentation of 10 to 15 minutes can be either in French or English, in the medium of your choice.

 

La tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée – 1ère édition

16 janvier 2015, Université de Montréal

 

Comparatistes : Affirmez-vous !

Les études en littérature comparée rassemblent une large communauté de chercheurs, assurant la vitalité d’une discipline dont les domaines d’application n’ont cessé de se diversifier. À l’image de ce paysage disciplinaire hétérogène, les projets de recherche des étudiant-e-s gradués sont riches et variés, bien que peu diffusés au sein même de la communauté. L’hiver dernier, des étudiantes se sont réunies pour penser une collaboration possible entre le Département de littérature comparée à l’Université de Montréal et le Centre de littérature comparée à l’Université de Toronto. Depuis, le manque flagrant de connexions entre les jeunes chercheurs des deux universités, mais aussi des autres universités canadiennes, est devenu une source de motivation pour imaginer un espace de rencontre qui nous permettrait, à nous étudiants, de partager nos projets de recherche tout en réfléchissant aux enjeux de notre discipline. À cet égard, la «Tribune des étudiant-e-s en littérature comparée » a pour ambition de favoriser davantage les échanges entre les étudiant-e-s comparatistes de deuxième et troisième cycles des universités canadiennes. En affirmant les singularités propres à chacun des programmes comparatistes, nous espérons identifier au mieux ce qui nous unit dans ce champ d’études, et tisser des amitiés durables entre les jeunes chercheurs. Pour sa première édition, en janvier 2015, la Tribune se tiendra à l’Université de Montréal, et s’articulera autour de la question des espaces de la littérature comparée. 

Occuper les espaces de la littérature comparée

Fort de sa spécificité polyglotte et interculturelle, le Canada constitue un espace privilégié pour les études comparatistes. Mais notre discipline, peu connue du grand public et mal identifiée au sein même de l’institution universitaire, souffre aujourd’hui d’un manque de reconnaissance institutionnel, tant et si bien qu’il nous semble urgent d’en affirmer, d’en afficher et d’en réfléchir la présence. Cette année, la Tribune propose ainsi d’explorer la question des espaces (géographiques, linguistiques, théoriques, etc.) de la littérature comparée – espaces de convergences mais aussi de tensions – au Canada. Parmi les problématiques que nous souhaiterions aborder :

    Comment le Canada se constitue-t-il en laboratoire comparatiste ?

    De quelle(s) façon(s) la littérature comparée pourrait-elle (re)prendre place dans des espaces institutionnels, mais aussi dans les espaces publics ?

    Comment considérer l’espace même de la littérature comparée, naturellement inscrite à la jonction de plusieurs domaines – l’interculturel, l’interdisciplinaire, l’intermédial, etc. ?

     Enfin, de quelles façons les limites de ces espaces théoriques, institutionnels et géopolitiques sont-elles affirmées, ignorées ou déplacées?

Nous invitons les étudiant-e-s des cycles supérieurs à venir présenter leurs projets de recherche, quels qu’en soit leur degré d’avancement, à travers le prisme de ces problématiques. Puisque la Tribune se revendique comme un espace convivial d’échange, de discussion et d’expérimentation, nous vous encourageons à privilégier des modes d’expression théoriques et critiques originaux, trans-médiatiques, ou même collaboratifs. Testez vos projets de recherche, débattez de votre approche méthodologique, performez votre thèse !

Nous attendons vos propositions (150-200 mots) pour le 24 octobre 2014 à l’adresse suivante: tribunelitcomp@gmail.com. Veuillez préciser votre université de rattachement et votre cycle d’étude. Votre présentation, de 10 à 15 minutes, pourra être prononcée en anglais ou en français, dans le médium de votre choix.

Survival/La survie: Call for Papers

The Centre for Comparative Literature’s 25th Annual Conference

on the theme of SURVIVAL

will take place March 12th – March 15th 2015. 

See details below and on the conference website (conference.complit.utoronto.ca/Survival).

Survival

Centre for Comparative Literature

University of Toronto

March 12th – March 15th 2015

Keynote Addresses: Professor Christopher Fynsk (University of Aberdeen) and Professor Elizabeth Rottenberg (DePaul University)

Linda Hutcheon and J. Edward Chamberlin Lecture in Literary Theory: Professor Eric Cazdyn (University of Toronto)

Every catastrophe tests the limits of the human drive for self-preservation and exacts our prolonged negotiation with what has happened and what is to come. Estranged from traditional scaffoldings for her desires and values, the need for survival forces the individual to recognize the insufficiency of her inner resources if she is to live otherwise. Survival under the weight of loss – of faces and words, of relics and homes, of meanings and intimacies – survival in the wake of catastrophe carries the presentiment of a transfigured existence. This promise is a call that brings people together to rebuild the fragile yet necessary connections that constitute a world. We conceive of survival in diverse modes: the future of the work of art after canonicity; the ethics of testimony and witness; the precarity of the environment; the fatal effects of heteronormativity; the inheritance of cultural histories through interpretations, translations and archives; the experiences of globalization, displacement, and conflict.

            The work of art survives the moment of its canonization. Its reification in the canon endows it with fame while the stamp of periodization and genre dissimulates other ways in which it might show itself. The fixed portrait of a work that has been embalmed in the mausoleum of impotent veneration is bound up with forms of critical scrutiny that monumentalize its endurance in life. In the ritual pageant of cultural heritage, the predicament of lives trapped behind glass partitions is the catalyst for critical interventions.

            Modes of criticism have been inherited via a cultural directory that shapes and is shaped by the same means of production that have debased the afterlife of art. To counteract this process of incremental consolidation, a critique that refuses to remain complicit with fantasies of mastery must shatter the ideology of preservation at all costs. To disrupt the deceptive veneer of genealogical continuity in order to rescue the particular from the grip of conservation, critical intervention must pulverize this false image of eternity.

            The myth of nature’s cyclical longevity and infinite duration belies the omnipresent threat of its extinction. The homogenizing forces of modern technology perpetuate the myth of Earth as inexhaustible reservoir. Such factitious discourses of vitalism continue to occur at the same time as the exponential proliferation of signs of environmental destruction. By situating what passes as natural in ‘natural catastrophes’ within the larger frame of global debt structures that perpetuate the mythic cycle of guilt and compensation, an ecology of survival would reclaim the force of analysis and the future of the intellect from market capitalism.

            Strategies of privatization that preserve a complex of institutions conceal the universal subject of debt constructed by them. We must comprehend a logic in which the need to systemically change our society has been replaced with a series of economic transactions that pacify individual afflictions. Our task as thinkers of survival is twofold: to render the contours of subjectivity burdened with debt and to construe our desire in its truth.

            The foreclosure of desires and intimacies reinforces a repertoire of compulsory imitations. In this theatre of desire, parodic mimicry takes its cue from cultural norms that dictate the terms of any possible oppositional stance. Playing empty roles that determine our ways of responding in advance, we lack a sense for recognizing otherness. An ethics of testimony bearing witness to what remains of otherness must reckon with questions of survival. To renew the dead script of our social interactions, a reflection on survival is necessary.

The organizing committee of this conference invites all contributions that respond to the need to rethink what survival means today. Possible topics for presentations include, but are not limited to:

  • Freudian death drive; the undead; the uncanny
  • Survivor’s guilt; mourning; surviving the death of others
  • The survival of the name
  • Suicide and sacrifice
  • Apocalyptic economies
  • Aesthetics of eschatology
  • Erotic foreclosure
  • Afterlife of artworks
  • Survival of/in capitalism
  • Intersection of survival and obsolescence
  • Apparitions; hauntology; revenants
  • Survival of philosophy and the humanities
  • The death of god
  • Class struggle; the nation-state; warfare
  • Surviving gender- and sexuality-based violence
  • Survivalist movements
  • Ecology; ecopoetics; anti-evolutionism
  • Consumer goods that have outlived their use (antiques; collectors)
  • Guilt and debt
  • Gentrification; architectural history; ruins
  • ‘Livability’

We invite joint proposals for panels/roundtables as well as proposals for individual talks. Proposals should be a maximum of 250 words. Individual talks should be approximately 20 minutes in duration and panels/roundtables should not exceed 90 minutes. If you are participating in a roundtable, please be prepared to speak for no more than 10 minutes in order to facilitate discussion. We request that you include a biographical statement of no more than 50 words. We prefer that all participants in panels/roundtables have been confirmed when the proposal is submitted. Our submissions deadline is October 1 2014. All proposals must be submitted via our website (conference.complit.utoronto.ca/Survival). Please contact us at conference.complit@utoronto.ca with any questions or concerns.

La survie

Centre de littérature comparée

Université de Toronto

12 mars – 15 mars 2015

Invités d’honneur: Professeur Christopher Fynsk (Université d’Aberdeen) et Professeure Elizabeth Rottenberg (Université DePaul)

Linda Hutcheon and J. Edward Chamberlin Lecture in Literary Theory: Professeur Eric Cazdyn (Université de Toronto)

Chaque catastrophe teste les limites de l’instinct de conservation et exige notre négociation prolongée avec ce qui s’est déroulé et ce qui est à venir. En la privant des structures traditionnelles pour vivre ses désirs et ses valeurs, le besoin de survie force la personne à reconnaître l’insuffisance de ses ressources internes si elle souhaite vivre autrement. La survie sous le poids de la perte – perte des visages et des mots, des reliques et des ports d’attache, des sens et des intimités – la survie à la suite de la catastrophe porte avec elle le pressentiment d’une existence transfigurée. Cette promesse est un appel qui unit les gens entre eux pour reconstruire les fragiles mais nécessaires liens qui font le monde. Nous concevons la survie de diverses façons : la précarité de l’environnement; les effets néfastes de l’hétéronormativité; la transmission d’histoires culturelles par les interprétations, les traductions et les archives; les expériences de mondialisation, de déplacement et de conflit.

L’œuvre d’art survit à sa canonisation. Sa réification au sein du canon lui confère la gloire, alors que le sceau de la périodisation et du genre dissimule d’autres façons dont elle pourrait se montrer. Le portrait figé d’une œuvre qui a été embaumée dans le mausolée de la vénération impotente est intrinsèquement lié à des modes d’examen critique qui monumentalisent sa pérennité. Dans le cortège rituel du patrimoine culturel, le malheur d’existences enfermées derrière des cloisons de verre est le catalyseur de l’intervention critique.

Des modes critiques ont été transmis par une grille culturelle qui construit, et est construite par, les mêmes modes de production qui ont dégradé la postérité de l’art. Pour contrecarrer ce processus de consolidation progressive, une critique qui refuse d’être complice des phantasmes de domination doit faire éclater l’idéologie de la préservation à tout prix. Pour perturber le vernis trompeur de la continuité généalogique, afin de libérer le particulier de l’étau de la conservation, l’intervention critique doit pulvériser cette fausse image d’éternité.

Le mythe de la longévité cyclique et de la perpétuité de la nature contredit la menace omniprésente de son extinction. Les forces homogénéisantes de la technologie moderne perpétuent le mythe de la Terre comme réserve inépuisable. Ces discours vitalistes trompeurs côtoient la prolifération exponentielle de signes de destruction environnementale. En situant ce qui passe pour naturel dans les « catastrophes naturelles » au sein d’un cadre plus large de structures de dettes qui perpétuent le cycle mythique de culpabilité et de compensation, une écologie de la survie récupèrerait la force de l’analyse et le futur de l’intellect accaparés par le capitalisme de marché.

Les stratégies de privatisation qui préservent un complexe d’institutions cachent l’être assujetti à la dette universelle qu’ils ont construit. Nous devons comprendre la logique au sein de laquelle le désir de changement systémique de notre société a été remplacé par une série de transactions économiques qui pacifient le malheur individuel. Notre tâche comme penseurs de la survie est double : rendre visible les contours de la subjectivité accablée par la dette, et interpréter notre désir dans sa vérité.

La saisie des désirs et des intimités renforce le répertoire d’imitations compulsives. Dans ce théâtre de désirs, l’imitation parodique suit l’exemple des normes culturelles qui dictent les termes de toute attitude d’opposition. En jouant des rôles vides qui déterminent à l’avance notre façon de répondre, il nous devient impossible de reconnaître l’altérité. Une éthique du témoignage attentive à ce qui reste de l’altérité doit prendre en compte un questionnement sur la survie. Pour renouveler le scénario mort de nos interactions sociales, une réflexion sur la survie est nécessaire.

Le comité d’organisation du colloque invite les contributions qui répondent au besoin de repenser ce que la « survie » signifie aujourd’hui. Les sujets possibles de présentations peuvent inclure, mais ne sont pas limités à : 

  • La pulsion de mort freudienne; les morts-vivants; l’inquiétante étrangeté
  • La culpabilité du survivant; le deuil; survivre à la mort des autres
  • La survie du nom
  • Le suicide et le sacrifice
  • Les économies apocalyptiques
  • Les esthétiques de l’eschatologie
  • La survie des oeuvres d’art
  • La survie du capitalisme / La survie dans le capitalisme
  • Le recoupement de la survie et de l’obsolescence
  • Les apparitions; l’hantologie; les revenants
  • La survie de la pensée critique et des sciences humaines
  • La mort de dieu
  • La lutte des classes; l’État-nation; les conflits armés
  • Survivre à la violence liée au genre et à la sexualité
  • Les mouvements survivalistes
  • L’écologie; l’« écopoésie »; le créationnisme
  • Les biens de consommation qui ont survécu à leur utilité première (antiquités; collectionneurs)
  • La culpabilité et la dette
  • L’embourgeoisement; l’histoire architecturale; les ruines
  • L’habitabilité

Nous invitons les propositions, d’un maximum de 250 mots, pour des ateliers ou tables rondes, ainsi que pour des présentations individuelles. Les présentations individuelles seront d’environ 20 minutes, et les ateliers ne devraient pas dépasser 90 minutes. Si vous participez à une table ronde, veuillez être préparé-e-s à ne pas parler plus de 10 minutes afin de favoriser les échanges. Nous vous prions d’inclure une biographie d’un maximum de 50 mots avec votre proposition. Nous préférons que tous les participant-e-s des ateliers et tables rondes aient été confirmé-e-s lors de la soumission des propositions. La date de tombée est le 1er octobre 2014. Toutes les propositions doivent être soumises sur notre site (conference.complit.utoronto.ca/Survival). N’hésitez pas à nous contacter à conference.complit@utoronto.ca pour toute question.

JOY – Call for papers

JOY-Logo

We are pleased to announce the Centre’s next conference

on the theme of JOY / LA JOIE

to be held February 27th-March 1st 2014.

All info on the website and Facebook, and CFP below.

 

JOY

Centre for Comparative Literature
University of Toronto
February 27th – March 1st, 2014

Keynote Address by:
Dina Al-Kassim (University of British Columbia)

“JOY” is the theme for the 24th annual conference of the Centre for Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. We invite you to consider the idea of joy in literary, theoretical, and interdisciplinary contexts.

What is joy, we would like to ask earnestly? What do literature, art, and philosophy say about joy? According to Gilles Deleuze, “You feel joy when you realize a potency, when you make a force real” (L’Abécédaire). And yet, how can the potential of one’s life be realized to the highest degree? Is the feeling of joy, or the quest for it, culturally defined, and does it entail broader implications for our understanding of the human? Is the temporality of joy a rupture in time, and does it disturb commonly accepted notions of subjectivity?

We propose to consider joy as a radical concept/emotion in the contemporary world. How are we to distinguish joy from happiness in a culture of self-help manuals, international happiness indexes, and widespread mood enhancers? If unhappiness is framed as a chemical imbalance, then what are we to make of joy? Can joy be understood as acceptance, affirmation, and creation of actual material conditions rather than a transcendental escape from realities?

By reflecting on emotions, we ask what the implications are of situating joy in relation to the exigencies of critical thinking. How can joy be thought of as a part of the embodied and embedded structures of the subject at the heart of the processes of knowing? Is there space for joyful processes of becoming, learning, and living? If such a space does—or did—exist, what are the implications of such affirmation in relation to the process of thinking itself?

In the literary context, we ask in what ways representations of joy are valued or perceived. Why is the influence of Shakespeare’s tragedies on popular culture and the collective consciousness (e.g. Romeo & Juliet archetypes; Hamlet’s inescapable quotation) deeper than that of his comedies? Why is joy a much less obvious literary focus than sombre subject matters? What can we say about the link between joy and imagination? Is humoristic literature necessarily joyful? What is the impact of joyful characters or episodes on narration and literary structure?

Finally, how is joy related to social justice and politics? We would like to explore the roles of joy as a motivator or an agitator, in addition to its ability to flourish in even the most harrowing of circumstances and to the role it plays in human resilience. How can we see paths for justice or social struggles as the subjective and collective realization of potencies, made in the mode of joy?

Suggested topics for exploration include but are not limited to:

–  Literature of joy

–  Affirmative ethics

–  Disruptive potentials of joy

–  Geographies of joy, cultures, and joyful encounters

–  Environment, non-humans and humans

–  Secret expressions: counter-cultures of joy

–  Legibility and histories of joy

–  Bodily expressions of joy: performance, spontaneity, dance

–  Musicality and the sounds of joy

–  Disciplining joy: artificial joy, self-help literatures, medical enhancement, positive thinking

–  Psychological and psychoanalytic conceptions of joy: desire, longing, memory, anti-Oedipus

–  Philosophical perspectives of joy: Braidotti, Leibniz, Spinoza, Deleuze, etc.

–  Religion, spirituality and joy

–  Joy and pedagogy

–  Bibliophilia, cinephilia, etc.

–  Joyfulness in writing or reading literature

–  Joyful characters or episodes

–  Aesthetics of joy and its manifestations in popular culture

–  Humour, the comic and the production of joy

–  Speculative notions of joy, science-fiction, and (bio)technology

We call upon scholars, intellectuals, and creative writers to submit proposals of no more than 250 words for a 20-minute talk, as well as a brief biographical statement of no more than 50 words, by October 4, 2013 via our website: http://conference.complit.utoronto.ca/Joy.

Please contact conference.complit@utoronto.ca for any questions.

LA JOIE

Centre de littérature comparée

Université de Toronto

27 février – 1er mars 2014

Invitée d’honneur :
Dina Al-Kassim (University of British Columbia)

« LA JOIE » est le thème du 24e colloque annuel du Centre de littérature comparée de l’Université de Toronto. Nous vous invitons à considérer le thème de la joie dans les contextes littéraires, théoriques et interdisciplinaires.

Qu’est-ce que la joie? Que peuvent nous apprendre la littérature, l’art et la philosophie sur la joie? Gilles Deleuze affirme que la joie est la réalisation d’une puissance. La question qui se pose alors est : comment le potentiel de vie d’une personne peut-il se réaliser au degré d’intensité le plus élevé? L’émotion de joie, ou sa quête, est-elle définie culturellement ou implique-t-elle un questionnement plus large sur notre compréhension de l’humain? Est-ce que la temporalité de la joie est une rupture dans le temps et perturbe-t-elle les conceptions établies de la subjectivité?

Nous proposons de considérer la joie comme un concept ou une émotion radicale dans le monde contemporain. Comment distinguer la joie du bonheur dans une culture où les livres de croissance personnelle, les pratiques du mieux-être et les indices nationaux de bonheur ont une place si importante? Si le mal d’être est présenté comme un déséquilibre chimique, qu’en est-il de la joie? La joie peut-elle être comprise comme une acceptation, une affirmation ou une création des conditions matérielles présentes plutôt qu’une fuite transcendantale de la réalité?

En réfléchissant sur les émotions, nous nous interrogeons sur les relations entre la joie et les exigences de la pensée critique. Comment la joie peut-elle être pensée comme un aspect des structures encorporées et situées des sujets qui participent au processus de réflexion? Y a-t-il une place pour les processus joyeux de devenir, d’apprentissage et pour les modes de vie joyeux? Si un tel espace existe ‒ ou s’il a existé par le passé ‒, quelles sont les implications d’une telle affirmation en rapport avec les processus mêmes de la pensée?

Dans le contexte littéraire, quelles sont les modalités selon lesquelles la joie est perçue ou évaluée? Pourquoi l’influence des tragédies de Shakespeare est-elle enracinée dans la culture populaire et la conscience collective (par exemple les archétypes de Roméo et Juliette ou l’inéluctable citation de Hamlet), alors que l’impact de ses comédies reste beaucoup plus marginal? Pourquoi les analyses littéraires s’intéressent-elles beaucoup moins aux thèmes de la joie qu’aux sujets plus sombres? Que peut-on dire du lien entre la joie et l’imagination? La littérature humoristique est-elle nécessairement joyeuse? Quels sont les impacts des personnages ou épisodes joyeux dans la structure d’une œuvre?

Finalement, la joie est-elle liée à la justice sociale et à la politique? Nous souhaitons explorer les multiples facettes de la joie comme moteur ou catalyseur, en plus de sa capacité à se développer dans les circonstances les plus difficiles et de son rôle dans la résilience. Comment les chemins menant à la justice et aux luttes sociales peuvent-ils être perçus comme la réalisation d’une puissance, portée par la joie?

Sans y être limités, les sujets à explorer incluent les thèmes suivants:

–  Littérature de la joie

–  Éthique de l’affirmation

–  Potentiel perturbateur de la joie

–  Géographies de la joie, cultures et rencontres joyeuses

–  Environnement, non-humains et humains

–  Expressions secrètes: contrecultures de la joie

–  Lisibilité et histoires de la joie

–  Expressions corporelles de joie: performance, spontanéité, danse

–  Musicalité et sons de la joie

–  Discipliner la joie: joie artificielle, littérature de croissance personnelle, humeur et médication, pensée   positive

–  Conceptions psychologiques et psychanalytiques: désir, envie, mémoire, anti-Œdipe

–  Perspectives philosophiques: Braidotti, Leibniz, Spinoza, Deleuze, etc.

–  Religion, spiritualité et joie

–  Joie et pédagogie

–  Bibliophilie, cinéphilie, etc.

–  Joie dans l’écriture ou la lecture

–  Épisodes ou personnages joyeux

–  Esthétique de la joie et manifestations dans la culture populaire

–  Humour, comique et production de la joie

–  Notions spéculatives de la joie, science-fiction et (bio)technologie

Nous vous invitons à soumettre vos propositions d’un maximum de 250 mots pour une présentation de 20 minutes, ainsi qu’une brève biographie d’un maximum de 50 mots, pour le 4 octobre 2013 sur notre site internet: http://conference.complit.utoronto.ca/Joy.

Contacter conference.complit@utoronto.ca pour toute question.

*Artwork by Klari Reis

CFPs

Have time on your hands? Need more things to do in a week? Check out some Calls-for-Papers and go to a conference or two in exotic locales (or in Rochester, NY).

Of course, the first place to look is the American Comparative Literature Association. Paper proposals are due by November 1st, 2012. http://www.acla.org/acla2013/

The UPenn CFP listings are probably the most comprehensive humanities listing, and include calls for journals and volumes, as well as for conferences: http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/